Ostriches put their heads in the sands where the H L do management put there’s?
February 2002

Once again we see the so called ‘white collar criminal’ stuffing a well and good reputable business by conning line managers, auditors and others to believe that the criminal is a good and trust worthy employee.
£500 million was lost or was it more. (BUTTON HERE) a calculation you can make to work out what is has cost the company.
Amarlis estimates the net loss will be in the region of
All the red flags were present as the trustee worked his way through breaking every rule in the book. But nobody saw them until too late.
Even then he was given a second chance.
Warning ‘ Reduce the amount you are dealing in, remember your upper limit is £5 million.’
Where were the safety valves, the monitors, and the protectors of the bank?

Just like Enron, it is easier to SEE NO evil, HEAR NO evil and definitely not to speak to somebody who is practising evil.

As long as I earn my bonus or constancy fee
Come on management that is why you are there.
Amarlis has carried out extensive research into how and what people think about fraud, working practices and responsibility. Have a look at the research paper and see for yourself (BUTTON HERE) or even better test your own thinking and fill in our questionnaire. (BUTTON HERE) Go on, how good are you?

The questions will not cost you a penny, but the thinking behind them will cause you to consider risk problems within your organisation.

If you have think you could have a risk call us for a confidential talk.
We might be able to help before IT IS TO LATE.

CAN YOU AFFORD TO LOSE OUT?

EXAMPLE
Assume

Turn over is £100,000
Gross profit at 30% £ 30,000
Net profit at 15% £ 15,000

Assume
Bank rate at 7%
Overheads variable
Business maintains position
Monies stolen £10,000

Cost of the fraud.
a = actual loss £10,000

b = additional turnover required to generate replacement of actual loss
£10,000 X 100/15 = £66,667
At cost sales 85% = £56,667

c = Interest lost by not holding actual loss deposit
£10,000 X 7% x10,000/5,000 = £1,400

d Financial cost X 7% = £3,967

Total loss £72,034